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Beyond Senior Design: Bringing Hospital Communications into the Future

By: Eli Freund, Editorial Communications Manager, UConn School of Engineering

Hospitals are one of the busiest places that an individual can be in. Doctors and nurses are running around, often supervising many patients, and during hectic times caregivers are confronted with the task of prioritizing patient’s needs, which is a very complex process. But two former UConn Engineering students are looking to streamline patient-caregiver interactions through a device called YouCOMM.

The device, which is being developed by two recent engineering alumni, Tom Cotton (B.S. BME ’17, M.S. BME ’18) and Daniel Yasoshima (B.S. BME ’17, M.S. BME ’18), is a tablet-based platform with an interface allowing the patient to choose their problem or need from a list, or write a custom message to the caregiver. Once completed, that message is sent as a text message directly to the caregiver assigned to that patient.

Read more @ Engineering News

Providing Innovative Solutions to Technical Challenges

By: Eli Freund, Editorial Communications Manager, UConn School of Engineering 

Two hundred and twenty-eight groups, consisting of nearly 800 seniors, stood proudly by projects ranging from as small as a cyborg insect, to as large as an all-electric car inside of Gampel Pavilion. The capstone projects, which were the culmination of a year’s-worth of work, are known as Senior Design, and are presented annually at Senior Design Demonstration Day.

Each of the projects presented at the Demonstration Day, sponsored by more than 100 organizations, provide students with extensive hands-on experience, and an opportunity to work on real-world problems presented by sponsoring organizations. Sponsors invest time and resources, and work in-depth with their individual groups and consulting faculty members to create innovative solutions that are often integrated back into their organization.

Read more @ Engineering News

WFSB Channel 3 Feature on Senior Design Demonstration Day

STORRS, CT (WFSB) – UConn engineering students displayed projects that they’ve been working on all year on Friday.

There’s about 230 projects, 800 seniors, in groups of 3 to 4, and they’ve been working on these projects all year long.

“Our project is to control an electric motor for that car over there. It’s very efficient for its size and weight and provides a lot of power output 80 kilowatts 107 horsepower,” said Daryl Biron, a UConn senior.

Wednesday was the UConn Senior Design Demonstration Day.

“This is a package delivery drone, it can pick up and identify boxes,” said David Kay, a UConn senior.

“These are the big ones, so they work throughout their entire four-year career here to get up to this point and they’re making incredible projects out there,” said Eli Freund, UConn School of Engineering Communications Manager.

Students have been working with over 100 private companies, municipalities, and organizations to help put together projects that will make a difference.

Read more @ Engineering News

Vibrational Therapy to Change the 
Outlook for Cerebral Palsy Patients

By: Eli Freund, Editorial Communications Manager, UConn School of Engineering

This article is part of a multi-part series on engineering students, and their journey through senior design. Click here to read part 1 of this article series.

Entering the final stretch of their Senior Design journey, the biomedical engineering team of Brianna Perry, Morgan DaSilva, Brittany Morgan, and Katie Bradley are realizing the crushing realities of real-world results versus perfect-world expectations.

In a perfect world, the team of four would be running trials with their cerebral palsy rehabilitation device on multiple CP patients, and all their equipment would be running perfectly. Unfortunately, that isn’t the case, according to Perry:

“After a long process, the Institutional Review Board finally approved our human trials, allowing us to get some participants,” Perry said. “Unfortunately, due to time constraints, and our inability to compensate participants, we were only able to enroll one CP patient in our trials.”

Read more @ Engineering News

Building The “Heart and Soul” of an Electric Car (Part 1)

By: Eli Freund, Editorial Communications Manager, UConn School of Engineering 

Twenty years ago, if you stood on a sidewalk and watched cars go by, chances are high that you would see little-to-no electric cars driving down the street. In 2017, electric car sales were higher than ever, with nearly 200,000 all-electric cars sold in the U.S. With the popularity of models from Tesla, BMW, and Chevy, consumers are starting to warm to the idea of charging their car, rather than filling it with gasoline. Because of that popularity, four Senior Design teams, including an electrical and computer engineering team featuring seniors Daryl Biron; Ernesto Ortega-Hernandez; and Alain Tshipamba, are working to complete an all-electric car for a national competition in June.

The portion of the car that Biron, Ortega-Hernandez, and Tshipamba are working on is the “heart and soul” of the vehicle—the powertrain. The sponsor of the project, the UConn Electric Motorsports, was originally formed in the spring of 2017, with the intention of getting like-minded students together to build a car that could compete in Formula North, a collegiate competition taking place during in the summer of 2018. The advisor of the team is Professor Ali Bazzi.

Read more @ Engineering News

Vibrational Therapy to Change the 
Outlook for Cerebral Palsy Patients

By: Eli Freund, Editorial Communications Manager, UConn School of Engineering 

In the United States, there are nearly 800,000 children and adults that exhibit one or more symptoms of Cerebral Palsy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10,000 new-born babies will develop Cerebral Palsy every year. One of the major symptoms for Cerebral Palsy patients is loss of motor function, taking away the ability to walk with ease, and creating difficulty in feeding. There have been several advancements in devices that aid individuals with Cerebral Palsy, but not enough devices that rehabilitate the patient. Four biomedical engineering students are looking to tackle that issue with their innovative Senior Design project.

Katherine Bradley, Morgan DaSilva, Brianna Perry, and Brittany Morgan, the four students involved in the project, are working on a brace, which would go on the hand and arm of a Cerebral Palsy patient, and would use vibration therapy to treat and strengthen the muscles in those parts of the body. The project is being sponsored by the Biomedical Engineering department, and the group is being advised by Professor Krystyna Gielo-Perczak.

Read more @ Engineering News